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on February 11, 2006 at 10:13:39 am
 

Welcome to the 'De Amicitia' wiki!

 

If anyone who finds this page knows of a good critical edition of the 'Laelius', I would appreciate knowing about it. I've found one printed in 1823 at my university's library, but I would like to find a (somewhat) more recent one. I can be reached at the email below.

 

My plan is to translate Cicero's 'Laelius - de amicitia' on this site. I want to use the wiki format to generate discussion concerning the translation and the 'laelius' as a work. For right now, my plan is to keep the translation as my own, although if there is enough interest I may make it open to the public; a true wiki-translation.

 

My ethic for the translation is as follows:

I believe that the ancient world was not that much different than the world in which we live. People were born, they lived their life according to certain standards, they wanted the same things we want, and they died. Sure, they didn't have cars, computers, or the concept of a 'global society'; but so what? Do these things really make that much difference in the real joys and problems of living as a human?

 

And so, I believe that the ancients had great things to say about being human. Cicero, whatever you may think of his politics, his style or his posturing, was a man with something to say. He is worth listening to.

 

That being said, I also believe that for a translation to be really true to the original author it must convey his thoughts to the audience, not just his words. My plan is to make my way through the 'Laelius', dropping anything that will not mean anything to a contemporary audience and adding anything that is necessary to make Cicero understood.

 

As of now, I am not allowing anyone else to edit this wiki. If anyone would like to contact me or make a contribution, I may be reached at:

mogle_d@yahoo.com.

 

Links to other Cicero resources

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